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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- controversial thing. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty, and the only major obstacle to the purchase then arises is that jefferson, himself, strict views of the power of the federal government led him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire territory, and he starts to hem and haw and say what we need is a constitutional amendment to give the government this power. now, napolian in france overthrew his government. he was not likely would be impressed by the argument. he makes noises saying, look, i'll just revoke the treaty. it's not been ratified yet. madison, our baseline alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: right, in the room for every negotiation. madison comes to jefferson, you can't do this anymore. you have to agree. you have to yield. it's too big an opportunity to let your strict view of the federal government hold sway. he backs down. they go. they make the purchase. that's fine. the way this story goes
or is this not a party related issue? >> guest: there's one party in washington and the state cap will come of the party money. frankly if you are ever elected to congress, we have to behave like every member of congress says because they want to get reelected, which means that to listen to people who provide money to pay for campaigns restaurant office and it's not going to be mary smith. it's going to be representatives of big corporations and wealthy individuals who just a little change here to be fair. but they want to do is on level the playing field and support the readers of the market. either way, there's no such thing as deregulation. there's only reregulation. only new regulation. i'm not going to defend every regulation code that looks at the interest of the company and customers and other parties in the place with the system that takes the consumer price. baseball regulations and everything is regulated and most of the regulations and federal code of regulations in the state were sought by corporations, business regulation of the defined playing field to prevent competitors and escape reader
party in washington, the party of money. and frankly, if you or i were elected to congress, we'd have to behave like every member of congress does if we want to get reelected, which means we have to his top the people who provide the money for the campaigns for us to run to office, and it's not just joe six pack and mary smith. it's representatives of big corporations and wealthy individuals who come pleading, i just need a little change here to be fair. but they really want to unlevel the playing field and thwart the rigors of the market. there's no such thing as deregulation. that's only new regulation, so what we have done is taken regulations -- i'm not going to defend every regulation, but we took a regulatory scheme that looked at the interests of companies and the interests of customers and other parties, and replaced it with a system of the corporations, by the corporations, that takes away consumer rights. everything is regulated. i like to say, baseball regulates right down to how many stitches on the ball and the color of yarn. everything is regulated. most of the regulatio
: there is one part in washington. it's the of money. there's one part in the state capital. it's the party of money but if you or i were elected to congress would have to be like every member cost of because if we want to get reelected which means that you listen to people who will provide the money to pay for the campaigns for us to run for office. it's not going to be joe sixpack and mary smith. it's going to be representatives of big corporations. and wealthy individuals who all, pleading, i just need a change here to be fair. what you really want to do is on level the playing field and force the rigors of the market. there's no such thing as deregulation. there is only we regulation. there so many regulation. so we've done is taken regulation -- i'm not going to defend every revelation but we took a regulatory scheme that was balanced to look at the interest of companies and look at the interests of customers and other parties, and replaced with a system of the corporations by the corporations who takes away consumer rights. everything is regulated. baseball regulates right now coming
't think that is in the state capitals and washington is what the founders had in mind because it is the company with campaign contributions or the threat of contributions to other people with you don't play ball and they are they only people that are really being heard. so i think a fundamental reform of the campaign contribution system would be important. and in my last book i suggested that we should put in place is a set of rules that once you're elected to an office like this you can't go to work with the industry's maybe we should pay lifetime pension and remove you from the economy. i suspect as costly as that might be it would be a lot cheaper than the things we are seeing now that are extracting billions and hundreds of billions of dollars from people's pockets but a market would never allow and getting them over to these corporations. >> host: back to the telecom industry there were remote control profits that were fascinating to me. would you go over that? >> guest: in kentuckians they go the same from scotland and the your famous from being very tight. they had a mo
in richmond, virginia, educated at washington university and later learned a ph.d. from yale. he spent his first ten years as a newspaper man mostly doing general assignment reporting, and i bet if i called on many of you, you could easily name his novels; "the right stuff," "in our time," "the bonfire of the vanities" and many more, and now "back to blood" which reflects miami back to all of us. how are we going to react to that? he is credited with the birth of new journalism and the death of the american novel by some. he is the mark twain of our time. how lucky are we to have a moment in time with him? and what better way to start this conversation -- hopefully i can get them to come to the stage -- than with a published author in his own right and a man whose name is synonymous with leadership, our own former mayor, manny diaz. manny diaz, let me turn it to you. hopefully, we can get him up here, and tom wolfe. please welcome them. [applause] >> well, good evening, everybody. and let's get this started. if "bonfire of the vanities," you chose new york with wall street and the upper ea
be last year. we started 20 years ago as martha's table in washington d.c. we have distributed more and more as the years have gone by because we've started newer models. especially in recent years we've distributed 10 million,11 million a year. we support programs across the united states and now over 40,000, and our funding comes from a lot of it comes from corporate marketing campaigns that we do as well as individual donors with some foundations. but we have also created a revenue-generating model which is the first book marketplace. >> host: now, ms. robinson, when you -- is there a special focus for first book? do you, do you do the preschoolers, or do you work through classrooms or what? >> guest: it's a great question. first book has actually built a pipeline to support all programs serving kids in need, all classrooms serving kids in need. and reading is fundamental is a good example. we have over 1900 reading is fundamental programs supported by first book as well as over 40,000 others. so headstarts, school classrooms, after school programs, mentoring, kids 0-18 are suppo
american legion. gets nominated to go to washington as the quote, unquote, boys nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington, he's already six feet tall, he strides to the front of the line when they got white house to president kennedy, and then kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton goes forward and gets his picture taken. he's so proud. he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor it family. he already by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of aver and president the united states. this is something that everyone knows him knows about. he talk about it is all the time. ..
politicians really enthusiastic about this. when we get to washington and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty and the only major obstacle but then arises is jefferson himself stripped construction and the federal government and led him to believe that the federal government didn't have the power to acquire territory. and he starts to say what we need in the government to give its power. now napoleon back in france is a man that had overthrown. he wasn't exactly likely to be -- >> host: institutionalized. >> guest: that is exactly right. he starts making noises saying i will just remote the treaty. it's not ratified yet. so then madison, an alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: that's right his closest friend, in the room for negotiation. jefferson can't do this anymore. you have to agree. it's a big opportunity to look your strict view of the federal government. and he agrees and backs out. jefferson has a great deal of skill. he chose monroe, the right person. he gets it through the senate successfully. he displays skill
but testing. this is one of the topics that comes up a lot here in washington and in the discussions on capitol hill that yeah, how would you describe that vision for us and tell as you would get rid of summer vacations? that is not going to be popular. >> guest: there's a lot there. the first dimension is, once you move the lecture from class time and you could have students looking at their own -- a lot of the concepts in this book and a lot of these are happening. they their schools that'll we are working with it are doing these things. there at our experiments but they are experiments that all the research and all of the intuition point in that direction. teaching it for the most part is a solitary profession. you are the only teacher in the room. it is lonely so you could have 100 students and you are not changing the student-teacher ratio. you may improve it but now you have four teachers in the room. of one of them gets sick you don't need a substitute teacher. they can mentor each other and to group things together but there's a whole dimension you can add. you can have a phy
to remember also that washington really believes in zero sum politics. this is not an original thought of mine, but it has been disillusioning unmolested coverage to see that the leaders on both sides have not been so much about how we fix a problem but gain and maintain power. and so a lot of these discussions have been about how the republicans rolled back the obama administration, making we can then ultimately overtaken and how they maintain that power once they have it. i mean, cloaked in the argument of what is good for america, but there is not allow a policy prescription in there. >> thank you. very good to see you. enjoyed so much talking to you. >> this event took place at the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information about the festival, visit texasbookfestival.org. >> up next on booktv, "after words" with guest host james hershberg of the wilson center's cold war international history project. this week, david coleman and his latest book, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." in it, the director of the miller center's p
in washington and with the discussions on capitol hill. but how would you describe that vision for us and you also talk about how you get rid of the summer vacation. let's dive into this. >> guest: you can have students working at their own pace and so a lot of the concept in the book and a lot of these are happening there schools working with and doing these things they are experiments that all of the research into vision is pointed in that direction it's for the sultry profession. you were the only teacher in the room and so you could have 100 students and you are not training the issue for you now have four in the same room and not one of them get sick the of a substitute teacher. the disconnect with different teachers and they can mentor each other and to group things together so there's a whole different dimension you can have a physics teacher or chemistry teacher and biology teacher teaching simultaneously so they understand all the sciences blend together. they are not these silo subjects of holistic understandings. the tests themselves you need an aspect of testing. all of the test m
that comes up a lot in washington and for the discussions on capitol hill. how would you, you know, describe that vision for us and you also talk about the summer vacation. let's start into this. >> the first dimension, once you remove lecture from class time, and allows it to rethink everything. a lot of this is happening. they're doing these things, these are, they have experiments that all the research in all of the tuition point in that direction, teaching for the most part gasol chair profession. .. the tests themselves, you need some aspect of testing. someone should be very skeptical of testing because all tests measure what they test. there's many more facets to a human being than that. the dimensions that, there could be some testing to make sure that they're getting core competency and core skills. the ones unmeasured right now our creativity. you can never give someone a creativity score but you can have someone generate a portfolio of work. as an employer we are hiring engineers. when we get these people from top schools in the country, what are you created? that's what engineeri
in washington and with the discussions on the hill, but how would you describe that for us? you talked about how you would get rid of summer vacations, probably not popular, but dive into this. >> guest: there's a lot there. the first to mention is once you remove lecture from class time, class time is a time for interaction, students working at their own pace. you can rethink everything. this is happening. schools we work with are doing these things. they are experiments, but they are experiments that all the research and intuition point in that direction. teaching is the most solitary profession. >> host: it's loney. >> guest: it's loany. you can have a hundred students, not changing the ratio, might improve it, but there's four teachers. if one is sick, there's not a substitute teacher. students connect with different teachers. do group things. there's a comangs to add. you can have a physics teacher, math teacher, chemistry teach herb teems simultaneously. all the sciences and math blend together but not siloed subjects. the test themselves, you need some aspect of testing, but someone shoul
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)